Archive for July 2017 - Page 2

    • Early ESSA plans dinged for not addressing needs of all kids

      (Mass.) The first round of Every Student Succeed Act state plans submitted to the federal education department show promise in terms of how states will identify and support struggling schools, but no state has submitted a plan likely to close achievement gaps between subgroups, according to new research.

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    • Trump tossed Obama’s healthy meals, but not wellness goals

      (District of Columbia) Even as President Donald Trump has moved to rollback much of the regulatory infrastructure left by the Obama administration, the nation’s K-12 schools face a deadline this year for complying with a student wellness mandate finalized last summer.

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    • S.C. takes hard stance on third grade reading proficiency

      (S.C.) Third graders in South Carolina schools will be held back beginning next year if they do not attain proficiency on the state’s standardized reading exam under the final prong of a 2014 state law designed to ensure students don’t struggle to read throughout their educational career.

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    • Better career readiness measure another year away

      (Calif.) The state’s new system for evaluating school performance is likely to go at least one more year without more comprehensive indicators for measuring when a student is ready to enter the work force, according to a memo from the California Department of Education.

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    • Ed. groups release resources to support undocumented kids

      (Calif.) Educators, administrators, students and their families now have access to an online toolkit that provides resources and links that aim to support undocumented youth, the California Equity Leadership Alliance announced last week.

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    • School safety report shows mostly positive outcomes

      (District of Columbia) Fewer teachers and students are reporting instances of bullying or other unsafe behaviors than 10 years ago, but stubborn trouble spots remain according to a federal school safety report.

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