Archive for March 2016

    • Pre-schools need better family engagement, teacher training

      (Tenn.) Reflecting priorities highlighted across the country, pending legislation would require pre-schools to develop plans that would outline how they would improve professional development and family engagement.

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    • Healthy relationships early may curb sex crimes later

      (Calif.) As colleges across the county struggle to reduce the high rates of sexual assault among young adults, California legislators want to attack the problem far earlier – in elementary school.

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    • Educator misconduct cases continue to choke the system

      (Calif.) The number of teacher misconduct cases awaiting an appeal hearing has actually increased since the governor and state lawmakers agreed last year to provide additional funding to help clear a backlog of some 265 open investigations.

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    • Congress urged to make further refinements to Title I

      (District of Columbia) Despite the overhaul Congress imposed on the Elementary and Secondary Education Act in December, a noted educational economist has suggested simplifying Title I funding grants by eliminating some and removing complex eligibility mandates on others.

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    • Feds to devote new center to discipline and SWDs

      (District of Columbia) Cognizant of the lack of support states and local school districts have in confronting behavioral problems among students with disabilities, the U.S. Department of Education is planning to open a new national center devoted to interventions aimed at keeping disruptive students in the classroom.

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    • Parents threaten lawsuit over LCAP violation

      (Calif.) The California Department of Education is being asked to withhold state funding from West Contra Costa Unified School District for allegedly not seeking public input into spending millions of dollars as required by law.

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    • Free tuition for students who teach early ed

      (Ohio) In a novel approach to two pressing problems, the city of Columbus has joined with Ohio State University to provide free college tuition to students willing to become early education teachers.

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    • Bill lays out new anti-truancy program

      (Calif.) After sitting idle for the better part of a year, a bill resurrected in January would set the ground rules for a new state program giving schools money to fight chronic attendance problems.

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    • Alaska study finds patterns of success after high school

      (Alaska) Female, white and urban students were more likely than their male, native and rural counterparts to enroll in college, according to a new study that tracked the trajectories of 40,000 students in the nation’s most northern and remote state between 2005 and 2012.

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    • School solvency threats now at a minimum

      (Calif.) The number of California school districts reporting budget problems has dropped to the lowest overall level in a decade, based on a biannual, mandated survey of financial data collected by the state.

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