Archive for July 2014 - Page 2

    • Conservative advocacy group pushes for charter funding

      (Va.) A well-connected lobbying organization closely aligned with conservatives has taken up the cause of charter school funding with an emphasis on facilities.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Public employee testimony Constitutionally protected

      (Wash., D.C.) In a case likely to expand some free speech protections for public employees, the U.S. Supreme Court this month ruled that the First Amendment shields court testimony that is outside the scope of the employee’s normal duties and which is given as “a matter of public concern.”

      CONTINUE READING
    • Early science skills indicative of learning achievement

      (Colo.) Quality science education in pre-school and kindergarten, though often neglected, may better predict later achievement and prepare students in the core subjects, according to a report issued by the Education Commission of the States.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Improving revenues hasn’t rolled back class sizes

      (Wash.) A rebounding economy and expectations that recreational marijuana will deliver a windfall in state revenues has raised hopes for an initiative aimed at decreasing class sizes in Washington’s K-12 schools.

      CONTINUE READING
    • A battle won in the war on teacher tenure

      (N.C.) Teachers in North Carolina won a battle in an ongoing war over job protections as legislative leaders gave up – at least for now – a proposal to eliminate tenure in exchange for an 11 percent raise. But sponsors of the plan promise they will continue their efforts.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Anti-Common Core fervor reaches the silver screen

      (Texas) The momentum behind the anti-Common Core State Standards movement is coming to a theater near you later this month in the form of an interactive experience hosted by conservative author and radio personality Glenn Beck.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Districts continue shift away from zero-tolerance

      (Calif.) Showing up late, texting in class and violating the school dress code are all considered minor infractions, but all have led to student out-of-school suspensions or expulsions. Today districts in states including California, North Carolina, Minnesota and Michigan are looking to restorative justice techniques more often as a way to handle behavioral problems and keep kids in school.

      CONTINUE READING
    • By getting it half right feds get it all wrong

      After taking a step forward by incorporating student outcomes into the accountability index for students with disabilities, the Office of Special Education Programs promptly took a gigantic leap backward by relying solely on standardized testing as the only measure of program performance.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Arts education in schools could grow under LCFF

      (Calif.) The state’s new school funding system, with its accompanying educational priorities, appears to be signaling renewed and widespread interest in integrating arts education into core curriculum.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Program expands learning beyond school walls

      (Wash., D.C.) For the past two summers, young people in Chicago have participated in one of the nation’s most innovative educational programs, visiting the city’s museums, zoos, parks and other community locales while documenting their real-world learning experiences online.

      CONTINUE READING