Archive for June 2017 - Page 3

    • Lawmakers streamline suicide prevention training protocols

      (Del.) A 15-year-old boy was shot by members of a local gang as he walked home from school last year. Only a few months before, a 16-year-old girl was assaulted by classmates in a bathroom at her high school and died of her injuries. And in 2012, 11 teenagers completed suicide while 39 more were hospitalized for self-inflicted injuries.

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    • Does “America first” mean civil protections come last?

      About 60 years ago, the 101 Airborne Division of the United States Army entered Little Rock Arkansas about the same time that President Dwight D. Eisenhower federalized the National Guard throughout the state. The reason for this massive display of force was to protect the well-being of nine black students who were intent on attending the all-white Central High School in that city.

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    • Another Sacramento effort to direct LCFF spending

      (Calif.) Legislation requiring detailed disclosure of education spending down to the school site moved out of the state Assembly last week without dissent, setting up this summer’s showdown between advocates for low-income families and Gov. Jerry Brown over the use of billions in state aid.

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    • U.S. pre-K enrollment falls behind European countries

      (District of Columbia) While increased state and federal funding has helped a growing number of children enroll in pre-kindergarten programs, the U.S. still lags far behind other high-income countries, according to a new study.

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    • Facility bond money could be flowing by year’s end

      (Calif.) Some of the $7 billion in borrowing approved by voters last fall for school construction could be flowing to districts before the end of this year, assuming final budget details get worked out in the coming week.

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    • STEM grants aim to boost school/business partnerships

      (Iowa) Schools that partner with local businesses to expand student access to hands-on science, technology, engineering and mathematics education could be awarded $25,000 under a grant announced by Gov. Kim Reynolds.

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    • Improper teaching assignments fall to record lows

      (Calif.) The number of teachers working outside their authorized area of specialty at the state’s lowest performing schools fell by about a third during the two school years ending in 2015, according to a new report.

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    • States put more emphasis on chronic absenteeism

      (Colo.) With federal law now requiring states to collect and report on chronic absenteeism, legislators and policy makers across the U.S. have put into place a variety of programs aimed at putting new emphasis on attendance issues, according to a new report from the Education Commission of the States.

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    • Teacher shortage bills make the cut, move to Senate

      (Calif.) Bills targeting induction fees for new teacher training programs and shortages in high demand subjects were among the many pieces of legislation that survived a key Assembly vote last week and are headed to the Senate.

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    • Troubling upswing in self-harm among school children

      (Tenn.) With new research showing a drastic upswing in the percentage of younger children and teens hospitalized for suicidal thoughts or actions throughout the country, experts are calling on schools to adopt intervention strategies for early primary grades.

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