Archive for February 2014 - Page 3

    • Districts moving ahead with Prop. 39 energy projects

      (Calif.) Armed with the guidelines for a new energy efficiency program, school districts across the state are beginning to access millions of dollars that will allow them to retrofit or build facilities that not only save money in the long run but also create higher quality learning environments for students.

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    • NY backs Common Core but wants waiver for disabled

      (N.Y.) In a move being closely watched by educators and policy makers across the country, New York’s Board of Regents has not only given ground on an aggressive transition to the Common Core standards but it also wants to back pedal on higher assessment benchmarks for students with severe disabilities.

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    • Teacher ratings would be kept private

      (Ky.) A new evaluation system being considered by the Kentucky Board of Education for teachers and principals would not be used to make personnel decisions until the 2015-16 school year and would hold individual ratings private.

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    • CA bill among many proposals to protect student data

      (Calif.) Legislation aimed at helping keep a student's personal information private has been introduced by a California lawmaker who joins others across the nation attempting to do the same thing.

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    • No-rules play policy sees decreased student confrontations

      (New Zealand) As policy-makers and school administrators grapple with how best to enforce school site discipline, a principal at small primary school outside Auckland has ordered a ‘no rules’ policy on the playground, apparently resulting in an immediate decrease in incidents of bullying, vandalism and injuries.

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    • Report urges deeper corporate involvement in K-12 ed

      (Mass.) U.S. corporations donate an estimated $3 billion to $4 billion a year to K-12 education but more can and should be done to ensure that philanthropy today actually leads to widespread improved student outcomes in the future, says a new report from the Harvard Business School, Boston Consulting Group and the Gates Foundation.

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    • Brown calls for new fees on teacher preparation review

      (Calif.) Still struggling to find a fiscal footing in the wake of the recession, the Commission on Teacher Credentialing would be granted additional authority to impose fees on educator preparation programs under a proposal from the Brown administration.

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    • Longer student day should accompany Common Core

      (District of Columbia) States and districts should consider adding time to the school schedule if they hope to successfully implement and gain from new, national Common Core standards, says a report released Tuesday.

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    • Low-performing charter given green light to expand

      (Calif.) Following through with a promise to hold underperforming charters to the same accountability standards as other schools, the California Charter Schools Association has challenged a decision by a San Jose district to allow a struggling charter to expand further.

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    • Research: Spelling program benefits disabled writers

      (District of Columbia) A deep dive into old research provides new evidence that a widely distributed spelling program can help improve writing skills of students with disabilities.

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