Archive for 2016- Page 2

    • School report cards not transparent enough

      (District of Columbia) States are overwhelmingly failing to provide parents with understandable, easy-to-find school accountability report cards, according to a new study.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Segregation in NYC schools may be a human rights issue

      (N.Y.) Despite attempts to address racial segregation in New York City schools through redrawing district zones and increasing choice for low-income families, the problem remains–prompting one city official to bring in the city’s human rights office.

      CONTINUE READING
    • SAB unlikely to untangle developer fee problem

      (Calif.) The State Allocation Board is set to meet today to take up a number of pressing issues concerning school overcrowding and dilapidated facilities. But don’t be surprised if they punt on the elephant in the room–what to do about a controversial hike in developer fees.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Pre-K grants for low-income kids awarded to 18 states

      (District of Columbia) Awards for the third installment of the federal Preschool Development Grant program will provide expanded access to new or improved high-quality preschool classrooms across 18 states.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Microsoft anti-trust suit still buying hi-tech tools for schools

      (Calif.) A 13-year-old antitrust suit against computer giant Microsoft is still paying off for California schools. State schools chief Tom Torlakson announced this week an additional $11.9 million from the settlement is being offered to local educational agencies for technology upgrades.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Students have a right to walkout and be marked truant

      (Calif.) Students may have the right to walk out of the classroom to join a protest–but the courts have also been clear, schools retain the right to punish the scofflaws for being truant, according to both school legal experts and civil rights advocates.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Feds give state more time on ESSA plans

      (District of Columbia) Although the incoming Trump administration might have other ideas, a new set of regulations released this week by the U.S. Department of Education effectively pushes back key deadlines tied to the Every Student Succeeds Act until the 2018-19 school year.

      CONTINUE READING
    • ED Code out of step with criminal sex offenses

      (Calif.) Over the past five years, the Commission on Teacher Credentialing has moved aggressively to streamline and update its system for adjudicating teacher misconduct cases–next month the board will look closer at the state’s definition of sexual offense.

      CONTINUE READING
    • Common Core non-fiction reading goals prove elusive

      (Wis.) Despite a push for more non-fiction reading in many states’ academic standards prompted by Common Core, new research shows students read only slightly more rigorous material than in past years.

      CONTINUE READING
    • State law silent on how to reel back big hike in builder fees

      (Calif.) Now that California voters have restored the state’s fiscal ability to help pay for school construction, a controversial hike in fees on builders is no longer needed, and seemingly set for repeal.

      CONTINUE READING