Archive for March 2015 - Page 2

    • U.S. Senate considers school discipline bill

      (District of Columbia) With lawmakers in a number of states showing interest in adoption of restorative justice policies, a U.S. Senator has introduced a bill that calls for more professional development of teachers and administrators aimed at improving school climate and clarifies Title I money can be used for such training.

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    • Brown’s adult ed plan gives new authority to outsiders

      (Calif.) School officials are worried that core adult education services may not receive priority under the governor’s proposed finance structure that gives outside agencies greater control over spending decisions.

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    • Georgia takes stock of school climate opinions

      (Ga.) State education officials are weighing their options for dealing with a large number of schools where the learning environment is considered below satisfactory under a new evaluation system.

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    • School Medicaid claims rejected again

      (Calif.) After several years of negotiations, federal administrators of a school-based Medicaid program appeared this week to issue a final rejection of some $460 million in claims for services provided by California schools dating back to 2009.

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    • Judges call adequacy suit a long shot

      (Pa.) In the latest challenge to state support for what constitutes an “adequate” education, a seven-judge panel in Harrisburg appeared skeptical that they had jurisdiction to define a “thorough and efficient” education.

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    • School transit funding back on the front burner

      (Calif.) The cost of bussing students to school – and the amount the state contributes to that effort – is expected back in the legislative spotlight today during a hearing on a bill that would increase reimbursement rates to districts.

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    • Student advocates want grief training for teachers

      (Ohio) Approximately one in 20 U.S. students will lose a parent or sibling by the time they are 16 years old, and a majority of students will have lost at least one member of their extended family by the time they graduate. Yet a 2012 American Federation of Teachers survey showed that only 7 percent of educators have received training to help support these students through their grieving process.

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    • Common Core voted out in South Carolina

      (S.C.) South Carolina last week officially joined Oklahoma and Indiana in doing away with the Common Core State Standards – the board of education voting unanimously to replace them with the newly-created South Carolina College- and Career-Ready Standards.

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    • School reserve cap could harm long-term capital projects

      This story was updated 3/17/17 @ 11:20 a.m.(Calif.) Last week, as school managers rallied at the state Capitol against a new law restricting how much money districts can hold in reserve, questions were being raised behind closed doors about how the spending cap  could impact long-term planning of costly facility improvement projects.

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    • SBE OKs rubric format but what to measure?

      (Calif.) The state’s Board of Education Wednesday gave its nod of approval to the design of a new tool that will be used to measure how well schools are educating students under a new funding system. But there is a long way to go to determine what elements should receive greater attention and whether the information is available to provide a reliable picture.

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